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Alien - reading

Abhorsen - Garth Nix

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Abhorsen is the last in the Old Kingdom series by Garth Nix. I'm sad to have finished these because I've enjoyed them rather a lot. I couldn't help comparing them to the Philip Pullman Dark Materials trilogy. I'm one of the few people who didn't care for Pullman's books; I thought them vastly over-rated and a cop-out, so it was pleasant to find that this series was anything but. Nix chose his female main characters and allowed them to be just that, 'main characters'. No male characters brought in to overshadow the girls... plenty of men around, yes, but not superceding the women. It is so refreshing. He has another series out which I forget the name of but which have days of the week in the title. I gather they're also good so I'll try to read those in 2007.

I'm already working out a reading plan for next year. Why, I've no idea... possibly because there are so many books I keep telling myself I *must* get around to that I wondered if I listed a few it might actually spur me on to read the things! We'll see.

I haven't got a current read. I started Agatha Raisin and the Day the Floods Came by M.C. Beaton, which was a 'surprise' Christmas book from the library. When I unwrapped it I was quite pleased as it sounded good but the writing is so appallingly juvenile that I can't be bothered to carry on with it. Shame. I felt that a nice bit of crime writing wouldn't go amiss. And so - I've no idea what I'm going to read next. Ho hum.

Comments

I use to love MC Beaton. I haven't read her in a long time, because I got bored with her.
The next book on my to read pile is "Holmes on the Range":

http://www.amazon.com/Holmes-Range-Steve-Hockensmith/dp/0312347804/sr=8-1/qid=1166155659/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-9797781-6635311?ie=UTF8&s=books

It looks so good.
Tell me what you think of this one when you've read it, as it sounds wonderful!
Will do.

(love your icon)
Yes, Pullman is highly overrated--most of all by himself, but I am interested in seeing how the movie of Compass turns out.

I've read so much in this class I've taken that for right now, I want nothing weighty at all--time for some fluff.
I didn't realise they'd made a movie of Compass. Will take a look at that when it's released.

Fluff is good. :-) It's certainly all I'm good for at the moment.
Nicole Kidman is Mrs. Coulter, and Timothy Dalton is Lord Asriel, so the adult casting that I know of is pretty strong.

I've seen a clip or two of Nicole and the actress playing Lyra--Nicole looks like what I imagined Mrs. Coulter to look like.

I've noticed Garth Nix's name a lot, but I've never read him. With that in mind, what would you tell me about this series? Why should I read it? :)
Speaking of Pullman:

I've read THE GOLDEN COMPASS, but not the others, not yet. I enjoyed THE GOLDEN COMPASS well enough, but I remember having some issues with it, and I resent his personal crusade against C.S. Lewis writing for children (I can't articulate the specifics, I'm afraid, cause it's all rather blurry in my head; anyone who can enlighten me, I'd be most grateful), because frankly, THE GOLDEN COMPASS is very MUCH written for a younger audience, though adults can certainly enjoy it.

That's my two cents, anyway. :)
I think with the Pullman books I also felt let down because of the hype that surrounds them. I really couldn't see what all the fuss was about. I didn't relaise he was pursuing a personal crusade against C.S Lewis and the Narnia books. What a shame. In my view there is room for all and children should be allowed to make up their own minds.
We discussed this issue at some length in my class; evidently Pullman disliked (bordering on hate) Lewis because he was not honest in his treatment of religion; Pullman felt that hiding the religious allegory behind Aslan and the other characters in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe was sneaky and a hurtful thing to do to children.

In one of the later His Dark Materials books (The Subtle Knife, I believe), there's a character named C.S. Latrom, who is absolutely portrayed as evil. My professor and other scholars think this is a dig at Lewis (check the initials, and the anagram of the last name).
I'm horrible with anagrams. :) What's Latrom stand for?

I don't find anything wrong with allegory personally, religious or not. They can be a strong teaching tool, even if Lewis didn't outright say THIS equals THIS.
Latrom anagrams to Mortal. :)

Allegories are great teaching tools--they can get past barriers that outright plain language could never breach.
I'm really wary of telling people they should read things these days as it backfires when then they hate the book/series. *g* The series is a mixture of horror (not terribly explicit) and fantasy and is aimed at YA. It has strong female characters and imo the series gets better as it goes along. The first one relied a little too heavily on a kind of Hammer House of Horror procession of ghouls to start off with. The second, not so much and I really liked the heroine, Lirael, in that one (and perhaps that was the best of the three...) It's not the best series in the world but I found them very readable indeed.