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Reading to cat

Illustrated books

I think I must be a big kid at heart because I like nothing better than discovering that a book I've just bought is illustrated in some manner, be it glorious paintings, pencil sketches or even just pretty chapter headers. Three recent purchases are a case in point.

The first is The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame. Now, I have a couple of copies of this wonderful book already. So, when I saw another in a local National Trust shop I looked briefly at it, saw it was fabulous but that it was £15 and walked away. But these things nag at you don't they? I went back for a closer look, actually left the shop then, and then couldn't get this gorgeous book out of my head. So yes, you're ahead of me... I went back *again*... and decided to buy myself a rather early birthday present. This is what I treated myself to:



The book is lavishly illustrated on every page by Robert Ingpen and I've done my best to photograph a few of the paintings.














I think that it's easily the most beautiful copy of The Wind in the Willows I've ever seen and after I *had* seen it, there was no way I could leave it behind. And... everyone who's looked at it since reckons it's worth every penny of what I paid for it.

Then there was an Oxfam shop find - Encounters with Animals by Gerald Durrell.



I didn't really bother to look to look inside, I saw what it was, saw that it was only £1.49 and bought it. When I got it home I found that it was illustrated with some lovely pencil drawings, the artist being Ralph Thompson. These photos aren't too great but they give you an idea.








And last but not least Dragons of Autumn Twilight which is the first in the Dragonlance series by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman and which I picked up in the Teignmouth Oxfam shop.



This is the paperback version, not the hardback, so I hardly expected it to be illustrated, but that was what I got! I took photos of these too but they really are not good, this one being the best and will give you an idea of the drawings that are all through the book. The artist here is Denis Beauvais.



I think it must have been my lucky week last week. Wandering into town I walked up to the market and came across a stall with a sign that said, ' The books on these two tables are free to a good home, please help yourself '. So I did.



I have to admit, I felt like a thief walking away without paying and kept expecting a tap on the shoulder! But wow... seven free books and I could have taken loads more, but thought I'd exercise a bit of self restraint for once. Where books are concerned I'm not exactly famous for it...

Comments

That Wind in the Willows is gorgeous!!! They're in keeping with the spirit of the book, as well as the style. When I read something, I'll imagine it with what I'm familiar with, but that's going to be wrong for anything not set in late 20th c. USA. Those are informative too, if that makes sense?

Lovely, lovely books.
I'm glad you agree, mind it would hard *not* to think this book is gorgeous. And I understand what you mean about them being informative. The detail on them is superb in many respects and tells you a lot.
Oh what a gorgeous edition - well done you for finding it! And I love the illustrations in the early Durrell books too, there's something very alive about them, I think. Your finds are wonderful!
I'm tempted to try and collect these early Durrell books... I'm assuming there are more in this Penguin style. The cover of this one is lovely too and I love its tattiness if that makes sense.
The Wind In The Willows book is utterly stunning - I couldn't have left that either. It's beautiful.
I had a feeling you would agree with me and approve of my purchase. :-)
Hee.

You do know me.
Oh, that Wind in the Willows is beautiful and the illustrations have that immensely satisfying quality of somehow chiming exactly with what is in my mind's eye when I read it. A real labour of love and a definite bargain!
When daughter J was a child, the library had an illustrated edition of Black Beauty and she borrowed that time and time again - I always hoped they would withdraw it from stock and sell it off so that we could grab it but if they did, we missed it!
My favourite illustrated childhood book was Heidi - Chalets, mountains and traditional alpine costume!
The book could have been even more of a bargain as last time I looked Amazon were selling it for 9.99. Oddly enough I don't mind the fact that I paid more.

Have you thought of searching for that edition of Black Beauty?

Oh and don't get me started on Heidi! I desperately wanted to live in the mountains and sleep in the loft after reading that. I must get a copy.

What gorgeous pix in The Wind in the Willows! I love them!
Well, hopefully you will get to see them in person this year. Is your trip still on?
Yes; in all likelihood it'll probably happen--but not this spring. It may well happen in mid-late October.

How would that work?
That would work absolutely fine for us. Something nice to look forward to.